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Summer may be over but that is no reason not to head to the beach. After all, the sun is still shining and it is still warm out here in Southern California. So last weekend, the first weekend of October, I headed to the Santa Monica Pier for the 4th Annual Off the Hook Seafood Festival. Kicking off National Seafood Month, Off the Hook Seafood Festival is helping raise awareness for the sustainable seafood movement as well as raising funds for Heal the Bay who is working hard to protect our Santa Monica Bay. An important cause centered around good food makes Off The Hook Seafood Festival the Please The Palate pick of the week. The seafood festival, with the mission to offer a "fun, foodie fundraising event that celebrates our beloved sea creatures, chefs, fishermen and ecosystems, and preserve our world’s oceans", took place on the Santa Monica Pier with the Ferris wheel and roller coaster in the background. 
When you think of your favorite cocktails, most of them are lead by familiar spirits like vodka, gin, tequila, rum, etc......but Sake?  TyKu Sake is paving the way for sake culture. Named by merging the words taekwondo and Haiku poems, TyKu represents the synergy of the two and highlights TyKu’s mission for respecting tradition and embracing tomorrow. While staying true to its origins and ingredients, TyKu offers premium sake that is great on its own or in a cocktail, as we learned recently when we joined TyKu at Sushi Roku for some cocktails and small plates. Sake is believed to have originated in Japan around 700 AD. Most surviving breweries were set up by landowners who grew rice crops and used the left over rice in their breweries to create what is known as Sake. Set out to create something authentic and true to its origins, American owners of TyKu lived in Japan for over four years and worked closely with the people of Japan to fully immerse themselves into the culture they have now brought to the public.