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Beppe Caviola may not be a familiar name to you. But, in Italy, he is considering one of the most important winemakers in Italy, consulting at more than 30 wineries around Italy, as well as making his own wine Ca'Viola. I met him on a recent visit to Piedmont, Italy and wrote about the famous "Flying Winemaker", also known as the "Dolcetto King" in my wine column in the Napa Valley Register. Sharing the story here.
During my recent travels in Piemonte, I visited winery after winery who told me that their consulting winemaker is Giuseppe “Beppe” Caviola. Known as “The Flying Winemaker” or “The Dolcetto King,” Beppe Caviola is a consultant to more than 30 wineries in Italy, from Piedmont to Sicily and from the Marche to Sardinia, some of which are the most legendary estates in the country. And in the heart of Dogliani, Beppe Caviola has his own winery, Ca’Viola, which in local dialect means “little violet house.”
Beppe Caviola is from Montelupo in the Langhe. He attended the Enological School in Alba and then worked at the Enological Center in Gallo, just outside Alba. He found a small vineyard in Montelupo, called Barturot, and began making wine in the garage of his parents’ house. After some encouragement to bottle the wine, Beppe bottled 860 bottles of Dolcetto is 1991 and Ca’Viola was born.
This story originally appeared in the Napa Valley Register.
Barolo. Just saying the name sounds important. It sounds regal. It sounds strong. When I lived in the Piemonte area in Italy shortly after college, I knew very little, if anything, about wine. But on the table at every meal, I was drinking Dolcetto and Barbera on a daily basis. It was on special occasions that my friends would pull out a bottle of Barolo. I did not have the vocabulary to describe wine. But I knew that this was a special wine.
At Pebble Beach Food and Wine, a panel of sommeliers lead a discussion of Barolo as we sat down for a tasting of the Giacomo Borgogno wines from 1967 to 2010. Founded in 1761, Giacomo Borgogno is the father of Barolo, the original Barolo producer. He was the first to put the local wine into a bottle and commercialize it, beginning the legacy. The Borgogno family managed the estate for 247 years until 2008 when they sold it to the Farinetti family and a new evolution for the winery began.
Barolo has always been a classic wine, considered one of the best. The name implies a big, bold wine, but in the glass, the lack of a deep color contradicted this.
I had the privilege to meet Franco Massolino upon his last visit to Los Angeles. Charming and friendly, Franco's passion about his wines and the region that they are from is infectious. Having lived in Piemonte, Italy, I have a natural affinity for the wines from that region. And once you meet Franco and taste his wines, you are captured by the beauty and structure of Massolino wines.