January 2017 - Please The Palate
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This story originally appeared in the Napa Valley Register.
I am talking about Law Estate Wines from Paso Robles, not about legal laws, despite what the title might suggest.
The winery is owned by Don and Susie Law. Both geologists who live in Denver, they first fell in love with wine on a trip to Spain in 1976. From there, a passion for Rhone-inspired blends developed. They spent two years looking for the perfect site to plant a vineyard when they were directed to Paso Robles.
The Laws found a piece of property on the west side of Paso Robles above Peachy Canyon Road in the Adelaida AVA. After analyzing 42 soil pits, they discovered limestone and low vigor soils, coupled with elevations of 1,600 and 1,900 feet and a consistent cool breeze. They purchased this ideal piece of land in 2007.
This story originally appeared in the Napa Valley Register. Learning about the wines of the world can be an overwhelming endeavor at times. There are so many countries that produce wine. Then there are all the regions within each country, not to mention the thousands of grape varieties.
Just when we get comfortable with the grapes and areas of Napa and Sonoma, then perhaps France, Italy or Spain, more regions are becoming prevalent in the U.S. market. Now we can find wines from Greece, Portugal, Georgia and beyond. And there is so much to learn. Greece alone has more than 300 indigenous varieties and more than two dozen wine regions. What do you know about Greek wines?
Here are some questions:
This story originally appeared in California Winery Advisor. Los Alamos – One Single Block Offering Days of Fun The town of Los Alamos is one block long. As you drive through the single main street, it will seem like you have entered an old pioneer town. It is almost like a movie façade. But look closely and you will see storefronts for wineries, restaurants and antique shops. This tiny town is a wine country destination. Los Alamos was a former stagecoach stop on the edge of the Santa Ynez Valley. A twenty-minute drive north of Solvang, Los Alamos was a sleepy town until a decade ago when refugees from Los Angeles arrived. Music industry, entertainment industry and fashion industry executives left their hectic city lives for the calmness of this little town. The town that used to be called “Los Almost” is now sometimes called “Little Los Angeles.” Los Alamos has also attracted young winemakers/entrepreneurs to set up shop there as the town, for the time being, is an affordable destination with unlimited potential.